The Glory Review: the Beautiful Song Hye-kyo in This Disturbing Revenge Drama

High school bullying and its terrifying consequences are often heartbreaking and frightening in Korean dramas. While it serves as a bleak piece of history, it also offers great insight into bullying in high school and how it pulls people over the edge — if my ID is Gangnam Beauty where a girl is so desperate for her looks that she gets plastic surgery, or we’re all dead watching gangs of bullies have free reign in ‘school and taking a girl to kill herself. Often times, victims go on a journey of forgiveness, eventually making peace and allowing the universe to deal with their abusers. However, Song Hye-kyo in her new revenge drama, The Glory is not a messenger for peace. He wants to take revenge quietly and not allow his oppressors (those who oppress them like words they enjoy) to have a moment of comfort 카지노사이트.

Song Hye-kyo has not received justice in her new series of shows, although they are among the highest-rated series in South Korea, such as The Gathering and the melodramatic Descendants of the Sun. There hasn’t been much to say about her character or she’s been completely spared by the efforts of her handsome male co-star. Although Ebube, he takes the opportunity to completely immerse himself in the character of someone who finds a way out of the abyss. It’s one of his best performances, if not his best, as Song seems to relish twisted revenge dramas like this one. His sarcastic words, a fierce praise for his one-time abuser, and a calm heart to match behind the near-perfect score are what carry the show. , even when it sometimes falls flat. Glory is a brutal and bloody film from the first eight minutes showing that there is no room for redemption, forgiveness or peace.

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The old proverb is true: “When you embark on a journey of revenge, begin by digging two graves, one for your enemy and one for yourself.” Moon Song Hye-kyo Dong-eun is dead inside as she says – the only thing keeping her alive is her thirst for revenge. He was punished, tortured and sexually assaulted by a group of rich children at school in the District made completely graphic to watch the rational mind should be advised. He destroys, and the fact that he becomes the first teacher of the girl ordered to torture is not a coincidence; he has been plotting well for a long time. You can see the desire for destruction that consumes him, especially in that terrible smile – he has not given up on murderous thoughts.

He watches his wife Yeon-jin (Lim Ji-yeon) celebrate her wedding and get the life she always wanted, waiting for the opportunity to strike. Song Hye-kyo portrays a strangely tragic side as she meets those who have left her behind – she enjoys her moments as they are distraught and trying to understand what her plan is. . But nothing is given to them or us as an audience easily, Glory is a quick fire of a revenge movie that can be stretched and invented at the core. The early episodes set up the stories and establish the characters – there’s no room for any sort of nuance and complexity in the antagonists; they are downright macabre. While it’s understandable that the show’s runners want to leave no wiggle room to justify themselves when it comes to them, their dialogue is oddly nasty at times, which kind of detracts from the effect.

The show could have done better without revealing too much moving Moon Dong-eun’s mental state and letting the audience see his gestures, his words, because that was too much. There are other chunky subplots in between, and hopefully they all fall into place to look more seamless in the part that arrives in March of this year. Although Song Hye-kyo’s performance in The Glory sometimes raises the alarming story, the cinematography and the terrible music also play the saviors, creating a show that is interesting and captivating, but it if it is good.

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There are sweet moments sprinkled throughout, as it promises to be the stuff of romance. However, the male lead, played by Lee Do-Hyun, has promised to be by her side in the dark. Glory is not an easy watch at all, especially because of its brutal casino places around the world depiction of oppression, it shows the terrible effects of oppression, suffering and how it cruelly oppresses the human soul. It’s a shocking insight into the abyss one can reach.